Climatocalypse

Climatocalypse: The end is near? Or at least the world as we know it? Whatever doom scenario is being reported these days, what leaves no doubt at this moment, is that we face numerous challenges of sustainability. Our prospects regarding basic pillars of our survival are not positive: our resources (Club of Rome Report), our economic growth (Larry Summers, Secular Stagnation), and our climate health. A recent ornithological study, The State of Birds, illustrates with conservative estimations how the extinction of 230 American birds species is already underway.

Of course, politics are part of the debate, and, granted, not always in a helpful way. But, however people may feel about climate change or sustainability issues, proactive reflection and action on these issues that affect our socio-economic peace and, possibly, survival, can no longer be postponed. Luckily several approaches are set in motion, also from the side of churches. Still instructive in this regard is the Church of England publication, Sharing God’s Planet. Examples of more recent faith initiatives here in the US are gathered on the site of Blessed Tomorrow.

Churches have also been joining the action trail. And a number of events are coming up. This Sunday, September 14, Just and Holy Food is gathering in our city: 358 Springside Avenue, 1-6pm, at Common Ground High School, with speakers and workshops: Rabbi Herbert Brockman from Congregation Mishkan Israel, Domingo Medina from New Haven Farms, John Turenne from Sustainable Food Systems, and Shamu Sadeh from Hazon will all be there. And next week, September 21, the People’s Climate March is planned in New York City, in advance of the United nations Summit on climate change. Details are here below in our enews.

The signs and facts of a sustainability crisis are present among us. We are no longer facing the question of if and where. It is now a question of when and how we prepare ourselves. The more we can prepare ourselves proactively the more targeted and peaceful we will be able to respond. Let us join the movement and engage in thoughtful action.

Blessings,

Luk